Ticking-off lists and wandering around in search of inspiration

This post is about a photograph I’ve been trying to ‘tick-off’ my mental list for quite a while without success. I’ve also included some interesting insights from using GPS tracking during two of my recent ‘wanderings’ through Padley Woods and Wyming Brook Nature Reserve in search of photographic inspiration.

Weather conditions in wintery England are notoriously changeable – no secret there! On days when I’m scouting a new location or just wandering around searching for inspiration, the changeability isn’t a major problem even if it’s raining and cold but it can be a problem when I want a specific shot and only have a few days in which to take it. This particularly applies to a few woodland photographs I’ve carried around in my mind for quite a while but with limited time in England it has proved difficult to ‘tick-off’ them all off my mental list.

I have been lucky enough to be in England and free for photography when the weather conditions were just right for one of those shots – shafts of dappled sunlight in a grove of silver birch trees, the hard textures of the tree bark contrasting with the softness of the grasses – (click here for the photo ‘Sunlight, shadows and silver birch’) . However, a couple of others on my list have proved more difficult to ‘tick-off’. Strange really since one requires rainy, wet conditions and the other, a misty day. You would think both were weather conditions easier to find in England than sunshine but they have proved to be elusive during the relatively short time I have in England during Spring, Autumn and Winter.

However, recently I was in England at the right time when it rained persistently so I managed to get over to Padley Woods and take a photograph of an interesting path that runs through part of the woodland. The path has been on my list for quite some time but when it’s dry and cloudy the gritstone rocks forming the path are grey and photographically ‘flat’ with low contrast so they don’t photograph well. However, when wet, they spring into life to become an intricate jigsaw of stone shapes. Here’s my photo of the path on a rainy day – another one ‘ticked off’ in my search (slow search!) for a coherent set of 15 woodland photographs.

Path through the woods

‘Path through the woods’

Waiting for specific shots over a long period of time sounds very organised and focused and I suppose it is, but it also means you have know a location well. It requires time spent exploring, searching for potential subjects and thinking about the impact of different light/weather conditions. I enjoy those ‘scouting days’ very much. They are an important part of the essence of landscape photography – out walking in the fresh air, surrounded by nature, continually making artistic judgements that one part of the landscape is worth framing whilst others aren’t. Malcolm Andrews talks about the photographic aspects of ‘landscape scouting’ in his 1999 book ‘Landscape and Western Art’ which starts by asking the questions “What is landscape?” and “How does land (the countryside) get to be promoted by the photographer/painter to become landscape?”.

He suggests (p.4) that as we wander through a location we are bombarded by potential photographs, a multitude of scenes, all “… visually auditioning to be landscapes (rather than just ‘land’)”. With that thought he confirms for me one of the enormous challenges for landscape photographers. For every scene we choose to transform into a lasting memory through our photographs there are hundreds of others we mentally reject. It involves a phenomenal amount of mental processing with the landscape photographer having to be even more ruthless than Simon Cowell, that well known talent show judge! This is particularly true with woodland photography but that’s an important part of its appeal to me – the challenge to visually simplify in my mind the complexity of woodland shapes, colours, lines, textures and light and then to take a two-dimensional photograph that captures the three-dimensional essence of the place as I originally ‘saw’ it.

Andrews describes the process with more academic eloquence (p.3), he says “In judging what is a ‘good view’ … We are selecting and editing, suppressing or subordinating some visual information in favour of promoting other features. We are constructing a hierarchical arrangement of the components within a simple view so that it becomes a complex mix of visual facts and imaginative construction. … it is what we do as we aim the camera viewfinder.” That’s exactly what I meant to say!

I love the mental imagery of landscape photography Andrews creates with his words. Visual facts combined with imagination, potential scenes auditioning to be immortalised by the photographer’s camera. I can almost see the trees dancing around in the wind trying to attract my attention.

Turning to a different type of imagery using the GPS function on my watch to track my progress during two recent trips searching for photographic inspiration. The first trip was to Padley Woods (of course) and the second to Wyming Brook Nature Reserve – a new location to me recommended by a fellow blogger Andy Gough who has a WordPress blog called ‘Learning the art of landscape photography’.

Padley Woods

Padley Woods

This first GPS image shows me wandering through a relatively small section of Padley Woods. It tells me I walked for 2.26 miles – not very far – but I was surprised to learn that it took me an average of 51 minutes to cover each mile! The GPS tracking highlights the locations where I had paused to take photographs. I can see the five areas where I stopped to explore the location in more detail and where I took the time to set up my tripod and take some photographs (some of the stops show up more clearly than others because of the image’s small scale).

The next tracking image is from my first exploration of Wyming Brook Nature Reserve, just outside Sheffield. An interesting woodland and stream location, certainly a place to re-visit for further exploration.

Wyming Brook

Wyming Brook

The GPS track says I covered 3.63 miles at an average pace of 36 minutes per mile! The distance of 3+ miles surprised me because I didn’t think I’d travelled anywhere near that sort of distance but the image suggests why I thought that, with my time concentrated in just two particular areas. The GPS track demonstrates in those two areas the landscape photographer’s equivalent of ‘running on the spot’, or ‘shuttle runs’, when the photographer stops and explores part of a location in great detail. Repeatedly searching for the ‘best view’ and the right framing before finally capturing the scene. I’m quite fascinated by these GPS tracks and will certainly use GPS tracking more in the future. They provide a useful record of trips and they also help identify specific areas of photographic interest within a location, geographically marking them for future exploration as seasons and weather conditions change during the year.

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  2 comments for “Ticking-off lists and wandering around in search of inspiration

  1. February 29, 2016 at 4:56 pm

    Thanks for sharing your images and words.
    I like the shot of the path in Padley Woods. Wet weather can sometimes be a bonus for us photographers!
    I read that you have been scouting for Wyming Brook. I went there recently after we had a few days of rain and the brook was in full force. (The last time I was there it was a trickle of a stream). The sights, sounds and smells made it a very rewarding visit. If you are interested I captured a few shots and there are 5 on my Postcard Cafe wordpress site.
    Should you fancy taking a look they are on the following link: https://postcardcafe.wordpress.com/?s=wyming+brook
    It is amazing how places can change so dramatically through different seasons.
    I have started following your blog and will look forward to seeing future posts. Best wishes, Mr Cafe 🙂

    • davidcollinsfoto
      February 29, 2016 at 5:22 pm

      Thanks for taking a look. I appreciate your comments, it is amazing the way streams such as those at Wyming and Padley Gorge swell as the water runs off the moors. Just had a look at your blog site also. Really like it. Great mix of street and landscape photos. Signed up to follow it. Looking forward to delving deeper into the photo galleries.

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